header-2.png for website

The Cuisine Art

Daley

Trinidad and Tobago Cuisine

Trinidad and Tobago cuisine is indicative of the blends of Indian, African, Creole, Amerindian, European, Chinese and Lebanese gastronomic influences.[1][2] Trinidad and Tobago has one of the most diverse cuisines in the Caribbean and is known throughout the world. There are more than one national dishes, in fact, there are so many that T&T may have more national dishes than any other country, national dhishes include Callaloo, Bake & Shark, Doubles, Pelau, Curried crab & dumplings, Oil Down, Pastelles, Black Cake, DHal Puri Roti, Buss-up-shot Roti (Paratha), Murtanie (a.k.a. Mother-in-law) and Souse.

Popular Breakfast Fast Food

  Sada roti which is usually served with: Fried or curry Bodi(long beans), Baigan choka (roasted eggplant), Tomato Choka (Roasted Tomatoes), Pumpkin Talkari (pumpkin simmered in garlic, onion, cumin), Aloo choka (Potatoes fried with onion and garlic), fried Plantain, Stew chicken liver or gizzard, and the popular bake and shark. Hashed browns with Vienna sausages and eggs is a breakfast combination made almost everyday throughout towns such as Diego Martin, Westmoorings and Valsayn.

Fried bake (a fried dough unleavened bread) usually served with: saltfish (dried and salted cod), sardine, corn or smoke herring (smoked, salted and dried fish), buljol (saltfish with fresh peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers and sometimes boiled eggs); Bacon, Fried Plantain, Stew Chicken, Corned beef with onions and tomatoes.

Coconut bake (coconut bread) usually served with: fried accra (saltfish fritters), black pudding, Butter, Cheese paste(a mixture of cheese carrots and mayo), tannia cakes (fried dasheen cake) and boiled yuca with butter, fried plantain and buljol.
Hot Milk Drinks:

Farine with powdered milk (farine-ground and parched cassava)

Chocolate tea (chocolate made from homemade cocoa balls)

Lunch and dinner


Callaloo A very popular and nationally well known dish with distinctly African roots is callaloo, a creamy and spicy side dish made of dasheen or Taro leaves, okra known locally as Okro, crab or pigtails, thyme, pumpkin, pimento, onions,coconut milk and shado beni (from "Chardon BĂ©nit,"French thistle or Fitweed) or bhandhanya (Hindi bandh dhanya, "closed cilantro") or culantro. Callaloo is often served with cornmeal coo coo, plantain, cassava, sweet potatoes, dumplings and curried crab. Pelau, a rice-based dish, is a very popular dish in Trinidad and Tobago, as well as stewed chicken, breadfruit oil down, macaroni pie, pepperpot, ox-tails, among many others. One of the most popular Trinidadian dishes is curried duck served with either roti or rice. Local curried duck cooking competitions are often held with multiple variations being created. A simple dish to make, but difficult to master, curried Muscovy is regarded as a delicacy which can be served at all times.


Street foods

Street Foods: Popular freshly prepared street foods include doubles, pholourie, bake and shark (particularly at a Maracas Bay, a popular beach on the North coast), curried shrimp roti, corn soup, geera chicken (Hindi jira, "cumin") and pork, raw oysters (usually sold at stalls where there is a lighted kerosene torch or flambeau) with a spicy sweet/hot sauce mainly with cilantro or chadon beni (Eryngium foetidum), saheena, kachori (Hindi kachuri), aloo (Hindi alu, "potato") pies, fish pies, cheese pies, beef pies (many Trinidadian neighbourhoods boast a local Pie-Man), and pows (Cantonese pao-tzu < baaozi, 'steamed wrapped roll with savoury or sweet filling)- steamed buns filled with meat, typically char siu pork. Sausage rolls are also eaten as midday snacks and are available at stands usually found along the nation's Street foods
Street Foods: Popular freshly prepared street foods include doubles, pholourie, bake and shark (particularly at a Maracas Bay, a popular beach on the North coast), curried shrimp roti, corn soup, geera chicken (Hindi jira, "cumin") and pork, raw oysters (usually sold at stalls where there is a lighted kerosene torch or flambeau) with a spicy sweet/hot sauce mainly with cilantro or chadon beni (Eryngium foetidum), saheena, kachori (Hindi kachuri), aloo (Hindi alu, "potato") pies, fish pies, cheese pies, beef pies (many Trinidadian neighbourhoods boast a local Pie-Man), and pows (Cantonese pao-tzu < baaozi, 'steamed wrapped roll with savoury or sweet filling)- steamed buns filled with meat, typically char siu pork. Sausage rolls are also eaten as midday snacks and are available at stands usually found along the nation's stree